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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Eric Schmidt
Executive Chairman of Google
FOXNEWSW 12/04/2013
Schmidt: Really outrageous that the National Security Agency was looking between the google data centers. if that's true, the steps the organization was willing to do without good judgment to pursue it’s mission and potentially violate people's privacy is not okay. It’s just not OK.
Michael Holmes
CNN Anchor and Correspondent, Co-anchor Around the World
CNNW 12/05/2013
Holmes: getting new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion, with a B, cell phone records around the world everyday. Those records are put into a huge database that can track the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected, who they’re calling and creates a web of information.
Barbara Starr
CNN Pentagon Correspondent
CNNW 12/05/2013
Starr: How much does it effect Americans? Well, by all accounts, if you're an American, you're out of the country on business or on vacation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be recorded by the NSA. why are they doing this? It’s what you’re saying. They're trying to establish a huge database of connections. they have terror suspects they want to go after, look at that, they look at who might be calling them and work their way back (through this web of information.)
Barbara Starr
CNN Pentagon Correspondent
CNNW 12/05/2013
Starr: this web of information. But you know, certainly privacy advocates in the united states and around the world are going to be extremely concerned about this thinking it's another you know, chip away into personal privacy in this cyber age. Holmes: U.S. is not meant to monitor Americans but if you're overseas, you're fair game, they're picking up – they’re vacuuming up all of this traffic, is that right?
Barbara Starr
CNN Pentagon Correspondent
CNNW 12/05/2013
Starr: Yeah, that’s certainly part of the problem. The NSA is not, under law, allowed to collect information on Americans, but in this, you know, again, in the cyberconnected world, they’re overseas and the NSA freely admits that there are times when they perhaps inadvertently, incidentally collect information on Americans, not supposed to happen. But you know, as we talk about, in this day and age, you go on into the internet, You click a few times, a commercial provider is recording the record of those transactions as well.
Barbara Starr
CNN Pentagon Correspondent
CNNW 12/05/2013
Starr: We're getting into that age where concept of privacy's limited. Holmes: forget about it. Malveaux: They're doing it, but can you fight back? Starr: well, that's a really good question. I don't know. I suppose you can call the NSA and object but you're not going to get very far. Holmes: I want to go on the do not call list. Starr: I don't mean to dismiss the question, it's hugely valid,
Barbara Starr
CNN Pentagon Correspondent
CNNW 12/05/2013
Starr: (If you're trying to call home,) if you’re trying to call your office, we at CNN Around the World, who knows how many cell phone calls we all make a day around the globe to our sources and we don't expect them to be tracked by the government and I think many citizens in other countries don't expect the NSA to be tracking their calls either. Holmes: Yes. Exactly. Talk about Americans being offended but what about those overseas who are apparently fair game? Barbara, always great to see you. Barbara Starr. Your phone is putting out -- you can track the phone just sitting there, you don't have to be on it Malveaux: GPS. true. Not much privacy. Holmes: There is no privacy.
Jim Sensenbrenner
U.S. Representative (R-Wisconsin), Chairman of Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security
FOXNEWSW 12/09/2013
Sensenbrenner: Definitely not good enough for me. It’s a crime to lie to Congress and Clapper admitted that he gave “the least untruthful answer.” Well, I think a little bit of a lie is like being a little bit pregnant. A lie is a lie and the only way congress can do it’s oversight properly is with truthful testimony. And that's why the laws are on the books that says that if you lie to Congress, you’ve committed a crime.
Judy Woodruff
PBS Anchor and Managing Editor of PBS NewsHour
KQED 12/09/2013
Woodruff: The giants of the tech industry made a highly public appeal today to rein in government surveillance. it came in the form of an open letter to president Obama. the call for curbs focused on people's personal information being collected from online traffic. 545 Eight major companies, including Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter, banded together to write an open letter to the president and congress. It appeared in full-page newspaper ads and (online)
Judy Woodruff
PBS Anchor and Managing Editor of PBS NewsHour
KQED 12/09/2013
Woodruff: online. the letter read in part: “The balance in many countries has tipped too far in favor of the state and away from the rights of the individual-rights that are enshrined in our Constitution. This undermines the freedoms we all cherish.” it's the tech giants' latest bid to salvage public trust, amid revelations that they've had to provide users' data to the government. the details come from edward snowden, who leaked a trove of material from the national security agency last summer.
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